Yet another citation linked to these two...
78th Regiment
Private James Hollowell
Date of Act of Bravery, 26th September, 1857.
A party, on the 26th of September, 1857, was shut up and besieged in a house in the city of Lucknow, by the rebel sepoys. Private James Hollowell, one of the party, behaved, throughout the day, in the most admirable manner; he directed, encouraged, and led the others, exposing himself fearlessly, and by his talent in persuading and cheering, prevailed on nine dispirited men to make a successful defence, in a burning house, with the enemy, firing through four windows. (Extract from Divisional Orders of Major-General Sir James Outram, G.C.B., dated 14th October, 1857.)
 

Medals of the Regiments:
The Royal Dublin Fusiliers

 
 
 
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The Royal Dublin Fusiliers

 Victoria Crosses
 
 
 

LG = London Gazette.

 
 

Regiment/Battalion

Date/
Location
Name  Citation/Notes

India Mutiny 1857 - 1859

1 1st Madras (European) Fusiliers26th September 1857
 Lucknow, India
Private
Thomas Duffy
LG 18th June 1858

For his cool intrepidity and daring skill, whereby a 24-pounder gun was saved from falling into the hands of the enemy. (Extract from Divisional Orders of Major-General Sir James Outram, G.C.B., dated 16th October, 1857.)

 

 
2 1st Madras (European) Fusiliers21st September 1857
 Mungulwar, India
Sergeant
Patrick Mahoney
LG 18th June 1858

For distinguished gallantry (whilst doing duty with the Volunteer Cavalry) in aiding in the capture of the Regimental Colour of the 1st Regiment Native Infantry, at Mungulwar, on the 21st of September, 1857. (Extract from Field Force Orders of the late Major-General Havelock, dated 17th October, 1857.)

 

 
3 1st Madras (European) Fusiliers26th September 1857
Lucknow, India
Sergeant
John Ryan
LG 18th June 1858

In addition to the above act*, [now reproduced below]  Private Ryan distinguished himself throughout the day by his intrepidity, and especially devoted himself to rescuing the wounded in the neighbourhood from being massacred. He was most anxious to visit every dooly. (Extract from Divisional Orders of Major-General Sir James Outram. G.C.B., dated 17th October, 1857.)

* "above act" in the Gazette refers to Private M McManus's (5th Foot) VC citation  ......     "5th Regiment .....Private Peter McManus Date of Act of Bravery, 26th September, 1857....On the same occasion N, Private McManus kept outside the house, until he was himself wounded, and under cover of a pillar, kept firing on the sepoys and preventing their rushing on the house. He also, in conjunction with Private John Ryan, rushed into the street, and took Captain Arnold, of the 1st Madras Fusiliers, out of a dooly, and brought him into the house in spite of a heavy fire, in which Captain Arnold was again wounded. (Extract from Divisional Orders of Major-General Sir James Outram, G.C.B., dated 14th October, 1857.)"

 

 

4 1st Madras (European) Fusiliers 16th November 1857
Lucknow, India
Private
John Smith
LG 24th December 1858

For having been one of the first to try and enter the gateway on the north side of the Secundra Bagh. On the gateway being burst open, he was one of the first to enter, and was surrounded by the enemy. He received a
sword-cut on the head, a bayonet wound on the left side, and a contusion from the butt end of a musket on the right shoulder, notwithstanding which he fought his way out, and continued to perform his duties for the rest of the day. Elected by the private soldiers of the detachment, 1st Madras Fusiliers

 

 

First World War  1914 - 1918

5 2nd Battalion18th October 1918
east of Le Cateau,
France
Sergeant
Horace Augustus Curtis
LG 6th January 1919

No. 14107 Sjt. Horace Augustus Curtis, 2nd Bn., R. Dub. Fus. (Newlyn East, Cornwall).
  For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty East of Le Cateau on the morning of the 18th October, 1918, when in attack his platoon came unexpectedly under intense machine-gun fire. Realising that the attack would fail unless the enemy guns were silenced, Sjt. Curtis, without hesitation, rushed forward through our own barrage and the enemy fire, and killed and wounded the teams of two of the guns, whereupon the remaining four guns surrendered.
   Then, turning his attention to a train-load of reinforcements, he succeeded in capturing -over 100 enemy before his comrades joined him. His valour and disregard of danger inspired all.

 

 
6 2nd Battalion23rd October 1916
 east of Lesboeufs,
 France
Sergeant
Robert Downie
LG 25th November 1916

No. 11213 Serjeant Robert Downie, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.
    For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty in attack. When most of the officers had become casualties, this Non-Commissioned Officer, utterly regardless of personal danger, moved about under heavy fire and reorganised the attack, which had been temporarily checked. At the critical moment he rushed forward alone, shouting, " Come on the Dubs." This stirring appeal met with immediate response, and the line rushed forward at his call. Serjeant Downie accounted for several of the enemy, and in addition captured a machine gun, killing the team. Though wounded early in the fight, he remained with his company, and gave valuable assistance whilst the position was being consolidated. It was owing -to Serjeant Downie's courage and initiative that this important position, which had resisted four or five previous ttacks, was won.

 

 

7 1st Battalion 4th October 1917
 east of Langemarck,
 Belgium
Acting Company Sergeant-Major
James Ockendon
LG 6th November 1917

No. 10605- Sjt. James Ockendon, R. Dub. Fus. (Southsea).
    For most conspicuous bravery in attack. When acting as Company Serjeant-Major and seeing the platoon on the right held up by an enemy machine gun he immediately rushed the machine gun, regardless of his personal safety, and captured it. He killed the crew with the exception of one man, who made his escape. Sjt. Ockendon however, followed him, and when well in front of the whole line killed him and returned to his company.
    He then led a section to the attack on a farm. Under very heavy fire he rushed forward and called upon the garrison to surrender. As the enemy continued to fire on him, he opened fire killing four, whereupon the remaining sixteen surrendered.

 

 
 

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